• ARRL Letter

    From Sean Dennis@1:18/200 to All on Fri Apr 19 09:35:13 2019
    ********************************************
    The ARRL Letter

    Published by the American Radio Relay League ********************************************

    April 18, 2019

    Editor: Rick Lindquist, WW1ME <ww1me@arrl.org>

    ARRL Home Page <http://www.arrl.org/>ARRL Letter Archive <http://www.arrl.org/arrlletter/>Audio News <http://www.arrl.org/arrlletter/audio/> IN THIS ISSUE

    - "Mentoring the Next Generation" is Hamvention and ARRL 2019 National Convention Theme
    - ARRL and FCC Sign Memorandum to Implement New Volunteer Monitor
    Program
    - New Tech: FCC Invites Comments on Waiver Request for 24 GHz Wireless
    Power Transfer Device
    - New Episode of "So Now What?" Podcast
    - Hamvention Opening Gates to All on Final Day of 2019 Show
    - Registration Opens for USA ARDF Championships
    - Just Ahead in Radiosport
    - The K7RA Solar Update
    - ARRL Foundation Announces Dick Hanna, K3VYY, Memorial Scholarship
    - Astronaut and Pioneer for Amateur Radio in Space Owen Garriott,
    W5LFL, SK
    - In Brief...
    - Getting It Right
    - Upcoming ARRL Section, State, and Division Conventions

    ARRL Headquarters will be Closed on Friday, April 19

    ARRL Headquarters will be closed on Friday, April 19. There will be no
    W1AW bulletin or code practice transmissions on Friday, and no edition
    of the ARRL Audio News podcast this week. ARRL Headquarters will reopen
    on Monday, April 22, at 8 AM EDT. We wish everyone a safe and enjoyable
    holiday weekend.

    "MENTORING THE NEXT GENERATION" IS HAMVENTION AND ARRL 2019
    NATIONAL CONVENTION THEME

    With an eye toward helping new and inexperienced hams enjoy the full
    range of activities that Amateur Radio has to offer, Hamvention <http://www.hamvention.org/>® and the ARRL 2019 National Convention
    will embrace the theme of "Mentoring the Next Generation." Hamvention
    hosts the National Convention May 17 - 19 at the Greene County
    Fairgrounds and Expo Center in Xenia, Ohio. This will mark the third
    year for Hamvention at its new venue. A contingent of ARRL staff and member-volunteers will join forces to make available many ARRL exhibits
    and resources to Hamvention visitors. The centerpiece of ARRL's
    participation will be ARRL EXPO in Building 2. An extensive roster of
    exhibits and activities <http://www.arrl.org/files/file/Hamfest/ARRL%20National%20Convention%20at%20201
    9%20Hamvention/2019%20ARRL%20National%20Convention%20at%20Hamvention.pdf>
    is available.

    Instructors from the ARRL Teachers Institute for Wireless Technology
    will be on hand to bring wireless and electronics theory to life in
    hands-on demonstrations and lessons. They'll also touch on satellite communications, microcontrollers, and the fundamentals of robotics. At
    a Sunday forum called "Discovering Radio Communications" (10:30 AM -
    11:30 AM in Room 2), presenters for the Teachers Institute will
    highlight a variety of instructional experiences and ideas.

    As part of its mentoring focus, ARRL has invited members of the Nashua
    (New Hampshire) Area Radio Society to Hamvention and ARRL EXPO to share
    the club's effective and well-developed outreach program. The ARRL
    Special Service Club, which boasts more than 200 members and is being recognized as the 2019 Hamvention Club of the Year, caters to radio
    amateurs of all interests and experience levels. NARS will host an
    interactive exhibit that may serve as a model for other radio clubs to
    emulate as well as a Friday forum, "ARRL Spotlight on Radio Clubs and Mentoring" (11:50 AM - 1:05 PM) in Room 3. ARRL-sponsored forums will
    include:

    - ARRL Laboratory Manager Ed Hare, W1RFI, will present "The ARRL Lab:
    Trials, Tribulations and (Tall?) Tales," on Friday (9:15 AM - 10:30 AM)
    in Room 3.

    - ARRL Great Lakes Director Dale Williams, WA8EFK, will moderate the
    popular ARRL Forum on Saturday (12 PM - 1:15 PM) in Room 3.

    - ARRL CEO Howard Michel, WB2ITX, will speak on "Engaging Today's Radio Amateur" on Saturday (1:30 PM - 2:30 PM) in Room 3.

    - Riley Hollingsworth, K4ZDH, a familiar face to many Hamvention
    visitors from his days with the FCC, will be on hand Sunday (9:15 AM -
    10:15 PM) in Room 2 to discuss "ARRL's New Volunteer Monitor Program
    and the FCC."

    - An ARRL Wouff Hong Ceremony <http://arrl-ohio.org/wouff-hong.html>
    will take place Saturday at 9 PM at the Marriott at the University of
    Dayton (Tradewinds Pavilion), sponsored by the ARRL Ohio Section. The traditional Wouff Hong ceremony is steeped in mystery and represents a tradition that goes back to the early days of ARRL history. Register
    online.

    For more information, see the 2019 ARRL National Convention: Exhibit & Activities Guide <http://www.arrl.org/files/file/Hamfest/ARRL20Convention202019%20Hamvention/201
    920National20at%20Hamvention.pdf>.
    Read more <http://www.arrl.org/news/mentoring-the-next-generation-is-hamvention-and-arrl-
    2019-national-convention-theme>.

    ???

    ARRL AND FCC SIGN MEMORANDUM TO IMPLEMENT NEW VOLUNTEER MONITOR
    PROGRAM

    ARRL and the FCC have signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) that
    paves the way to implement the new and enhanced Volunteer Monitor
    program. The memorandum establishes the Volunteer Monitors as a
    replacement for the Official Observers (OO) program. Current OOs have
    been encouraged to participate in the new program.

    Riley Hollingsworth, K4ZDH.

    "We are excited by the opportunity to codify our partnership with
    the FCC and to work together to achieve our mutual interests of
    protecting the integrity of our Amateur Radio bands," said ARRL
    President Rick Roderick, K5UR. "This Memorandum of Understanding will
    serve as the foundation for a new level of partnership on this very
    important issue."

    ARRL has contracted with retired FCC special counsel and former
    Atlantic Division Vice Director Riley Hollingsworth, K4ZDH, to oversee
    the ARRL's role in the development and implementation of the Volunteer
    Monitor program.

    Approved by the ARRL Board of Directors at its July 2018 meeting, the
    new Volunteer Monitor program is a formal agreement between the FCC and
    ARRL in which volunteers trained and vetted by the ARRL will monitor
    the airwaves and collect evidence that can be used both to correct
    misconduct or recognize exemplary on-air operation. Cases of flagrant violations will be referred to the FCC by the ARRL for action in
    accordance with FCC guidelines.

    The intent of this program is to re-energize enforcement efforts in the
    Amateur Radio bands. It was proposed by the FCC in the wake of several
    FCC regional office closures and a reduction in field staff.

    "Under this program, the FCC will give enforcement priority to cases
    developed by the Volunteer Monitor program, without the delay of ARRL
    having to refer cases through the FCC online complaint process,"
    Hollingsworth said.

    Hollingsworth has committed to FCC and ARRL officials to ensure the
    adequacy of training for the new positions, to review the quality and
    utility of Volunteer Monitor submissions to the FCC for enforcement
    actions, and to advocate for rapid disposition of cases appropriately
    submitted to the FCC.

    ARRL officials estimate that the first Volunteer Monitors will be in
    place and ready to begin their duties within 6 to 9 months. Read more <http://www.arrl.org/news/arrl-and-fcc-sign-memorandum-to-implement-new-volunte
    er-monitor-program>.

    NEW TECH: FCC INVITES COMMENTS ON WAIVER REQUEST FOR 24 GHZ
    WIRELESS POWER TRANSFER DEVICE

    The FCC Office of Engineering and Technology (OET) is seeking comments
    in ET Docket 19-83 on a request by Auspion USA, Inc. to waive the
    Industrial, Scientific, and Medical (ISM) rules' "local use"
    requirement (FCC Part 2 and Part 18 rules) for a 24 GHz wireless power
    transfer device over distance. On January 3, Auspion requested a waiver
    of FCC rules to allow it to obtain a grant of equipment authorization
    for the marketing and operation of a nonā€‘consumer system using
    transmission of wireless power over distance. Auspion's "WiPod" system
    would provide power to, and/or charge, receivers located at various
    distances from the transmitter.

    §18.107(c) of the rules defines ISM devices as "[e]quipment or
    appliances designed to generate and use [local] RF energy for
    industrial, scientific, medical, domestic or similar purposes,
    excluding applications in the field of telecommunication." Auspion
    requests that the Commission waive the "local use" condition, as
    specified in ISM Part 18 rules to allow its system to operate at
    distances greater than 1 meter between the transmitter and receivers,
    as long as the transmitted power is directed to very precise locations
    (called "power spots") where the receivers are sited. Auspion plans to
    market its system exclusively for industrial, retail, and enterprise applications, such as charging industrial robots, warehouse-based
    drones, and smartphones in conference rooms.

    Parties should file all comments and reply comments in ET Docket 19-83
    using the Commission's Electronic Comment Filing System (ECFS <http://apps.fcc.gov/ecfs/>). Comments are due by April 25, and reply
    comments are due by May 10.

    NEW EPISODE OF "SO NOW WHAT?" PODCAST

    "All About Safety" is the focus of the new (April 18) episode of the So
    Now What? <http://www.arrl.org/so-now-what> podcast for Amateur Radio newcomers. If you're a newly licensed Amateur Radio operator, chances
    are you have lots of questions. This biweekly podcast has answers! So
    Now What? offers insights from those who've been just where you are
    now. New episodes will be posted every other Thursday, alternating
    new-episode weeks with the ARRL The Doctor is In
    <http://www.arrl.org/doctor> podcast.

    So Now What? is sponsored by LDG Electronics
    <http://www.ldgelectronics.com/>, a family owned and operated business
    with laboratories in southern Maryland that offers a wide array of
    antenna tuners and other Amateur Radio products.

    ARRL Communications Content Producer Michelle Patnode, W3MVP, and W1AW
    Station Manager Joe Carcia, NJ1Q, co-host the podcast. Presented as a
    lively conversation, with Patnode representing newer hams and Carcia
    the veteran operators, the podcast explores questions that newer hams
    may have and the issues that keep participants from staying active in
    the hobby. Some episodes will feature guests to answer questions on
    specific topic areas.

    Listeners can find So Now What? on Apple iTunes <https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/arrl-so-now-what/id1451019115?mt=2>, Blubrry <https://www.blubrry.com/arrlnowwhat/>, Stitcher <https://www.stitcher.com/> (free registration required, or browse the
    site as a guest) and through the free Stitcher app for iOS, Kindle, or
    Android devices. Episodes will be archived on the ARRL website.

    HAMVENTION OPENING GATES TO ALL ON FINAL DAY OF 2019 SHOW

    Hamvention® has announced that it will open the gates to all, without
    charge, on Sunday, May 19, the final day of the annual gathering at
    Greene County Fairgrounds and Expo Center in Xenia, Ohio. Hamvention
    2019 General Chair Jack Gerbs, WB8SCT, said the idea is to encourage
    the curious to see what attracts some 30,000 visitors to Hamvention
    each spring.

    Hamvention General Chair Jack Gerbs, WB8SCT.

    "This will make it a little easier and cheaper for someone with just
    a little interest in Hamvention to see what all the excitement is
    about," Gerbs said.

    In addition to the features and equipment that attract radio amateurs,
    non-ham visitors will get to see vendors selling a variety of other
    electronic equipment, including computers and accessories, security
    devices, networking supplies, tools, and other items of interest to the
    general public. Those visiting the flea market area may be surprised at
    what's available, often at a small fraction of its original cost.

    Gerbs pointed out that Sunday is Hamvention's lightest traffic day,
    making it convenient for anyone who just wants check out what's there. Hamvention will be open on Sunday from 9 AM until 1 PM.

    Greene County Sheriff Gene Fischer, KX8GCS, has arranged to make text
    alerts possible again this year for those wanting up-to-the-minute
    mobile phone alerts regarding weather, traffic, parking, and other
    useful information affecting the event. Text "Hamvention19" to 888777
    to sign up. Those who signed up for the text alerts in 2018 already are registered for this year's event.

    The text alerts supplement the Hamvention talk-in station that has
    operated for many years on the Dayton Amateur Radio Association 146.94
    repeater (123.0 Hz tone) to give directions and other assistance. Read
    more <http://www.arrl.org/news/hamvention-opening-gates-to-all-on-final-day-of-2019-
    show>.

    REGISTRATION OPENS FOR USA ARDF CHAMPIONSHIPS

    Registration is now open for the 2019 USA and IARU Region 2
    Championships of Amateur Radio Direction Finding (ARDF), set for August
    1 - 4. Competition venues will be near Raleigh, North Carolina.

    "The USA ARDF Championships are an ideal opportunity to watch and learn
    from the best radio-orienteers in the US and from around the world,
    because visiting competitors from numerous other countries are expected
    to attend," said ARRL ARDF Coordinator Joe Moell, K0OV. "Winners who
    qualify by citizenship or residence may be selected for positions on
    ARDF Team USA, which will travel to Serbia for the 2020 ARDF World Championships."

    Thursday, August 1, will be devoted to the foxoring <http://www.homingin.com/sprints.html#foxoring> championship. Foxoring
    is a combination of radio direction finding and classic orienteering.
    Friday morning will be the sprint
    <http://www.homingin.com/sprints.html>, a short course with 12-second
    fox transmissions instead of the usual 60 seconds each, followed by a
    model event for equipment testing and a competitor briefing.

    Classic 2-meter and 80-meter competitions will take place Saturday and
    Sunday, respectively. An awards banquet on Saturday evening will
    include presentation of medals for foxoring, sprint, and 2-meter
    classic events; awards for 80-meter classic will be given out on Sunday afternoon immediately after the competition.

    Members of the Backwoods Orienteering Klub (BOK
    <https://backwoodsok.org/>) will organize the 2019 USA and IARU Region
    2 Championships. The International Amateur Radio Union (IARU) sets ARDF Championship rules <http://www.homingin.com/intlfox.html#rules>. For
    scoring and awards, participants are divided into 11 age/gender
    categories <http://www.homingin.com/intlfox.html#categories>.

    The USA ARDF Championships are open to anyone who can safely navigate
    the woods by themselves. A ham radio license is not required. Each
    participant competes as an individual -- any teamwork or GPS use is
    forbidden.

    Information bulletin #2 <https://docs.google.com/document/d/e/2PACX-1vQvC5cPwrgpk4gJLTM1qrfEJuJqnKlNGgt
    hioAtRqbF7V-iGEOFwG23dEYNKX2_j06APSY8S_njehYM/pub>
    contains the complete schedule, technical details, lodging, T-shirts,
    fees, rule variations, and more. Bulletins and links for online
    registration are on the event web page <https://backwoodsok.org/2019-ardf-us-and-region-ii-championships> on
    the BOK site. An email reflector <https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/usa2019ardf/info> is available for
    Q&A with the organizers as well as for coordinating transportation and arranging equipment loans.

    Basic information on international-style transmitter hunting is on the
    "Homing In" radio direction finding website <http://www.homingin.com/>.
    Read more <http://www.arrl.org/news/registration-opens-for-usa-ardf-championships>.
    -- Thanks to Joe Moell, K0OV <k0ov@homingin.com>

    JUST AHEAD IN RADIOSPORT

    - April 19 - 20 -- Holyland DX Contest (CW, phone, digital)

    - April 20 -- ES Open HF Championship (CW, phone)

    - April 20 -- QRP to the Field (CW, phone)

    - April 20 -- Feld Hell Sprint

    - April 20 - 21 -- Worked All Provinces of China DX Contest (CW, phone)

    - April 20 - 21 -- YU DX Contest (CW, phone)

    - April 20 - 21 -- CQMM DX Contest (CW)

    - April 20 - 21 -- Nebraska QSO Party (CW, phone, digital)

    - April 20 - 21 -- Michigan QSO Party (CW, phone)

    - April 20 - 21 -- EA-QRP CW Contest (CW)

    - April 20 - 21 -- Ontario QSO Party (CW, phone)

    - April 22 -- Run for the Bacon QRP Contest (CW)

    - April 24 -- SKCC Sprint (CW)

    - April 24 -- 432 MHz Spring Sprint (CW, phone)

    - April 24 -- UKEICC 80-Meter Contest (CW)

    - April 25 -- RSGB 80-Meter Club Championship (Digital)

    See the ARRL Contest Calendar <http://www.arrl.org/contest-calendar>
    for more information. For in-depth reporting on Amateur Radio
    contesting, subscribe to The ARRL Contest Update <http://www.arrl.org/contest-update-issues> via your ARRL member
    profile email preferences.

    THE K7RA SOLAR UPDATE

    Tad Cook, K7RA, Seattle, reports: New sunspot group 2739 appeared on
    April 17, and the daily sunspot number rose to 24. The new sunspot's
    polarity indicates that it's still part of Cycle 24, the current
    sunspot cycle. This reporting week (April 11 - 17) the average daily
    sunspot number rose from 6.9 to 14, while average daily solar flux
    increased from 75.4 to 76.4.

    Geomagnetic indicators were quieter, with the average planetary A index declining from 10.6 to 6.4.

    Predicted solar flux for the next 45 days is 76, 74, and 72 on April 18
    - 20; 70 on April 21 - 23; 68 on April 24; 69 on April 25 - 26; 70 and
    69 on April 27 - 28; 71 on April 29 - 30; 70 on May 1; 72 on May 2 - 3;
    77 on May 4; 79 on May 5 - 6; 78, 79, and 77 on May 7 - 9; 78 on May 10
    - 17; 71 on May 18 - 19; 69 and 68 on May 20 - 21; 69 on May 22 - 23;
    70 and 69 on May 24 - 25; 71 on May 26 - 27; 70 on May 28; 72 on May 29
    - 30, and 77 and 79 on May 31 - June 1.

    Predicted planetary A index is 5 on April 18 - 26; 10, 8, and 5 on
    April 27 - 29; 10 on April 30 - May 2; 7, 5, and 13 on May 3 - 5; 10,
    14, and 7 on May 6 - 8; 8 on May 9 - 10; 5 on May 11 - 20; 10, 8, and 5
    on May 21 - 23; 10, 8, and 5 on May 24 - 26; 10 on May 27 - 29, and 7,
    5, and 13 on May 30 - June 1.

    Jon, N0JK, reports that summer sporadic-E season began on April 14,
    when he copied K2PL and KE3QZ in Kansas on 6 meters.

    Sunspot numbers for April 11 - 17 were 13, 14, 14, 11, 11, 11, and 24,
    with a mean of 14. The 10.7-centimeter flux was 78.5, 77.3, 77.9, 75.4,
    75.4, 74.2, and 76.1, with a mean of 76.4. Estimated planetary A
    indices were 7, 9, 8, 4, 8, 6, and 3, with a mean of 6.4. Middle
    latitude A index was 6, 7, 7, 3, 8, 6, and 3, with a mean of 5.7.

    A comprehensive K7RA Solar Update is posted Fridays on the ARRL
    website. For more information concerning radio propagation, visit <http://arrl.org/propagation-of-rf-signals> the ARRL Technical
    Information Service, read
    <http://arrl.org/the-sun-the-earth-the-ionosphere> "What the Numbers
    Mean...," and check out <http://k9la.us/> K9LA's Propagation Page.

    A propagation bulletin archive <http://arrl.org/w1aw-bulletins-archive-propagation> is available.
    Monthly charts <http://arrl.org/propagation> offer propagation
    projections between the US and a dozen DX locations.

    Share <k7ra@arrl.net> your reports and observations.

    ARRL FOUNDATION ANNOUNCES DICK HANNA, K3VYY, MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP

    The ARRL Foundation has announced the Dick Hanna, K3VYY, Memorial
    Scholarship. Created through the generosity of the Hanna Family in
    memory of J. Richard "Dick" Hanna, K3VYY, of Beaver Falls,
    Pennsylvania, this scholarship is intended exclusively for educational
    use, to provide assistance with the cost of tuition, room, board,
    books, and/or other fees essential to the higher education of the
    recipient. Preference is given to applicants residing in western
    Pennsylvania or in eastern Kentucky.

    The applicant must:

    - be a US citizen, but without regard to gender, race, national origin, handicap status, or any other factor.

    - be performing at a high academic level (grade point average of 3.0 or higher).

    - hold a valid FCC-issued Amateur Radio license, with preference given
    to applicants holding a General-class license or higher.

    - be enrolled in an accredited 4-year college or university and
    pursuing a degree in a science-, math-, engineering-, or
    technology-related field, or in an accredited program in aviation or
    fire science.

    Dick Hanna, K3VYY.

    The grant will be $1,000 annually, with the first scholarship
    expected to be awarded in 2020. The ARRL Foundation Board of Directors
    will disperse the scholarship funds to the recipient's school of
    choice. Scholarships are for the exclusive use of the recipient.

    Hanna was first licensed in 1962 as KN3SVL. He died in 2017. Survivors
    include his wife Pamela, WB3BHJ, and sons Doug, N4YKQ, and Brian,
    KF7ORO.

    Including the new Hanna scholarship, the Foundation will be awarding 98 scholarships from 77 funds in 2020, totaling $142,650.

    ASTRONAUT AND PIONEER FOR AMATEUR RADIO IN SPACE OWEN GARRIOTT,
    W5LFL, SK

    Owen K. Garriott, W5LFL, the US astronaut who pioneered the use of
    Amateur Radio to make contacts from space, died April 15 at his home in Huntsville, Alabama. He was 88. Garriott's ham radio activity ushered
    in the formal establishment of Amateur Radio in space, first as SAREX
    (the Shuttle Amateur Radio Experiment), and later as ARISS <http://www.ariss.org/> (Amateur Radio on the International Space
    Station).

    "Owen inspired legions of Amateur Radio operators worldwide to support
    human spaceflight Amateur Radio endeavors and for countless individuals
    to become ham radio operators," observed ARISS-International President
    Frank Bauer, KA3HDO.

    Garriott, an Oklahoma native, thrilled radio amateurs around the world
    by making the first contacts from space during 10 days aboard
    Spacelab-1 during a 1983 Space Shuttle Columbia mission. Thousands of
    hams listened on 2-meter FM, hoping to hear him or to make a contact.
    Garriott ended up contacting stations around the globe, among them such notables as the late King Hussein, JY1, of Jordan, and the late US
    Senator Barry Goldwater, K7UGA.

    "I managed to do it in my off-duty hours, and it was a pleasure to get
    involved in it and to talk with people who are as interested in space
    as the 100,000 hams on the ground seemed to be," Garriott recounted
    during an interview published in the February 1984 edition of QST.

    Garriott simply used a handheld transceiver with its antenna in the
    window of Spacelab-1. His first pass was down the US West Coast.

    "[A]s I approached the US, I began to hear stations that were trying to
    reach me," he told QST. "On my very first CQ, there were plenty of
    stations responding." His first contact was with Lance Collister,
    WA1JXN, in Montana.

    Garriott shared a Hamvention Special Achievement Award in 2002 with
    fellow Amateur Radio astronaut Tony England, W0ORE. His son, Richard
    Garriott, W5KWQ, was a private space traveler to the ISS, flown there
    by the Russian Federal Space Agency, and he also carried ham radio into
    space.

    IN BRIEF...

    ARRL has rolled back Outgoing QSL Bureau rates to 2011 levels.
    Effective May 15, 2019, the new rates will be: $2 for 10 or fewer cards
    in one envelope; $3 for 11 - 20 cards in one envelope, or 75 cents per
    ounce for packages with 21 or more cards. For example, a package
    containing 1.5 pounds of cards -- 24 ounces, or about 225 cards -- will
    cost $18. There are no transaction service fees. Any cards received
    before May 15 will be charged the current rate. There will be no
    adjustments for cards received before May 15. More information <http://www.arrl.org/Outgoing-QSL-Service> is on the ARRL website.

    ???

    A new billboard on Interstate 40 in Tennessee promotes ARRL and Amateur
    Radio. Working with ARRL Product Development Manager Bob Inderbitzen,
    NQ1R, and Communications Manager Dave Isgur, N1RSN, ARRL Graphic
    Designer Sue Fagan, KB1OKW, completed a design for a new 10 × 20
    billboard, owned by ARRL Life Member Cliff Segar, KD4GT. Segar says the
    average daily traffic count for the area along I-40 west bound, mile
    marker 336, is on the order of 6 million vehicles per year.

    ???

    American Honda has announced a voluntary recall of some 200,000
    portable generators sold in the US, due to a potential fire and burn
    hazard. The recall includes the EU2200i, EU2200i Companion, and EB2200i generators. The US Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) says the
    affected portable generators can leak gasoline from the fuel valve.
    Users should stop operating the recalled generator and contact an
    authorized Honda dealer for a free repair. Honda is also contacting
    users directly. For more information, visit the CPSC website <https://www.cpsc.gov/Recalls/2019/american-honda-recalls-portable-generators-d
    ue-to-fire-and-burn-hazards>.
    A similar recall has been issued in Canada.

    GETTING IT RIGHT

    The item "FCC Agrees to 90-Day Pause in Consideration of WT Docket
    16-239" in the April 11 edition of The ARRL Letter contained an error.
    It should have said, "The Commission's proposed changes differed from
    the ARRL's initial filing and caused ARRL to be concerned about
    possible interference to current users resulting from the deletion of
    ARRL's requested 2.8 kHz bandwidth limitation."

    UPCOMING ARRL SECTION, STATE, AND DIVISION CONVENTIONS

    - April 20 -- North Carolina State Convention <http://rarsfest.org/>,
    Raleigh, North Carolina

    - April 26 - 28 -- VHF Super Conference
    <https://vhfsuperconference.com/>, Sterling, Virginia

    - April 27 -- Delaware State Convention
    <http://radioelectronicsexpo.com/>, Georgetown, Delaware

    - April 27 -- Aurora <http://www.nlrs.org/>'19 Conference <http://www.nlrs.org/>, White Bear Lake, Minnesota

    - April 27 -- ARRL North Texas MentorFest
    <http://www.arrlntx.org/mentorfest>, Garland, Texas

    - April 27 -- RV Radio Network Rally <https://rvradionetwork.com/>,
    Linwood, North Carolina

    - May 5 -- Eastern Pennsylvania Section Convention <http://www.k3dn.org/hamfest/>, Bristol, Pennsylvania

    - May 17 - 19 -- Hamvention -- ARRL National Convention <http://www.hamvention.org/>, Xenia, Ohio

    - May 31 - June 1 -- Arizona State Convention
    <http://hamfest.w7yrc.org/>, Prescott, Arizona

    - May 31 - June 2 -- Northwestern Division Convention
    <http://www.seapac.org/>, Seaside, Oregon

    - June 1 -- Georgia Section Convention
    <http://www.atlantahamfest.org/>, Marietta, Georgia

    - June 1 - 2 -- Western Pennsylvania Section Convention <http://www.breezeshooters.org/>, Prospect, Pennsylvania

    - June 7 - 8 -- West Gulf Division Convention <http://www.hamcom.org/> (Ham-Com), Plano, Texas

    - June 15 -- W8DXCC DX Convention <http://www.w8dxcc.com/>, Owensville,
    Ohio

    Find conventions and hamfests in your area
    <http://www.arrl.org/hamfests>.

    ARRL -- Your One-Stop Resource for
    Amateur Radio News and Information.

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    available every Friday.

    Subscribe to...

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    statistics, scores, NA Sprint, and QSO parties.

    - QEX <http://www.arrl.org/qex> -- A Forum for Communications
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    --- GoldED+/LNX 1.1.5-b20180707
    * Origin: Outpost BBS * Limestone, TN, USA (1:18/200)
  • From Sean Dennis@1:18/200 to All on Fri May 3 08:52:42 2019
    ********************************************
    The ARRL Letter

    Published by the American Radio Relay League ********************************************

    May 2, 2019

    Editor: Rick Lindquist, WW1ME <ww1me@arrl.org>

    ARRL Home Page <http://www.arrl.org/>ARRL Letter Archive <http://www.arrl.org/arrlletter/>Audio News <http://www.arrl.org/arrlletter/audio/> IN THIS ISSUE

    - ARRL Reply Comments Stress Need to Update Technician Privileges in a
    Digital World
    - World Scout Jamboree Gearing Up for Significant Amateur Radio
    Presence
    - Science and Technology: An Ultra-Small Transmitter for VLF?
    - So Now What? Podcast
    - ARRL's Free Exam Review for Ham Radio Updated
    - The K7RA Solar Update
    - Just Ahead in Radiosport
    - HamSCI, Ham Radio 2.0 to Combine Efforts at Dayton Hamvention 2019
    - Annual Armed Forces Day Crossband Test Set for May 11
    - In Brief...
    - Upcoming ARRL Section, State, and Division Conventions

    ARRL REPLY COMMENTS STRESS NEED TO UPDATE TECHNICIAN PRIVILEGES IN
    A DIGITAL WORLD

    In reply comments to the FCC (comments on comments already filed) on
    its Petition for Rule Making
    <https://www.fcc.gov/ecfs/filing/1022823795806> (RM-11828), ARRL has
    stressed that updating HF privileges for the entry-level Technician
    license "is the sole subject and intent" of the petition. ARRL filed
    its reply comments on April 29, urging the FCC to disregard comments
    irrelevant to its petition and maintaining that Technician privileges
    must be relevant within the context of today's technological
    environment.

    "[T]he increasingly rapid pace of change in communications
    technologies, coupled with the national need for self-training in
    science, technology, engineering, and math" necessitate the rule
    changes requested, ARRL asserted. "ARRL made its request because of the
    gap between today's digital technologies and the privileges accorded
    the current entry-level Technician license." ARRL characterized its
    proposal to update the rules as "balanced and modest."

    "If adopted, there would be no change to the operating privileges for
    all license classes other than those of the Technician class," ARRL
    said. In 2018, ARRL asked the FCC to expand HF privileges for
    Technician licensees to include limited phone privileges on 75, 40, and
    15 meters, plus RTTY and digital mode privileges on 80, 40, and 15
    meters. The FCC invited comments on the proposal in April.

    ARRL pointed out that some comments filed on its petition address
    subjects related to other open proceedings rather than expanding
    Technician privileges, citing comments cross-filed in such proceedings
    as WT Docket 16-239, RM-11708, RM-11759, and RM-11831. "Those filings
    should be considered in the proceedings that they address, rather than
    here," ARRL said.

    ARRL said some opposition appears based on fears of increased
    interference potential due to additional digital operation by
    Technicians. "It is improbable that all, or even a majority, of
    Technician licensees suddenly would develop a passion for the same
    digital technology," ARRL said. "Our hope and expectation is that many
    will engage with digital modes on the high-frequency spectrum at issue,
    but it is unrealistic to suggest that every Technician licensee blessed
    with new privileges would suddenly appear on the same band."

    The comments note the development of very efficient digital modes, such
    as FT8, which occupies just 90 Hz of spectrum per signal. "The
    experience with FT8 clearly demonstrates the attraction of the digital
    modes and the spectrum efficiencies that can be achieved," ARRL said.
    "This is why opening up limited digital opportunities to new radio
    amateurs so clearly would serve the broad public interest as well as
    the specific purposes of Amateur Radio in experimentation and
    innovation, as enumerated in the governing FCC rules."

    ARRL further said that comments regarding disagreement on the
    definition of encryption for masking the content of certain digital transmissions are also "out of place in this proceeding" and "should
    not delay initiation of a proceeding" proposing to update Technician privileges.

    "Technology has changed dramatically in the Amateur Radio domain, and
    ARRL believes the requested Technician license enhancement would foster
    the regulatory goals for the Amateur Service and continue to increase
    amateurs' historical experimentation and service in a meaningful way,"
    ARRL concluded.

    +++

    WORLD SCOUT JAMBOREE GEARING UP FOR SIGNIFICANT AMATEUR RADIO
    PRESENCE

    Amateur Radio will be a part of this summer's 24th World Scout Jamboree
    in West Virginia, the first World Jamboree held in North America since
    1983. The Jamboree has chosen the theme "Unlock a New World." Thousands
    of Scouts and Scout leaders from some 200 countries are expected to
    attend. The Jamboree's Amateur Radio Exhibit will use the call sign
    NA1WJ <https://www.k2bsa.net/world-jamboree-na1wj/> -- North America's
    1st World Jamboree. It will be on the air during the event, July 22
    until August 2, at the Summit Bechtel Reserve, hosted by Canada,
    Mexico, and the US. Amateur Radio testing is expected to begin as early
    as July 14. Operating frequencies will be posted in real time via
    Facebook <https://k2bsa.us5.list-manage.com/track/click?u=56ce1526bb2372707f5868e21&id=2 040fbdc79&e=f04efd1977>
    and Twitter <https://k2bsa.us5.list-manage.com/track/click?u=56ce1526bb2372707f5868e21&id=9 518437486&e=f04efd1977>
    or via an NA1WJ email group <https://groups.io/g/na1wj>.

    "The goals of the Amateur Radio station at the World Scout Jamboree are
    to introduce Amateur Radio to Scouts and Scout leaders through hands-on participation in two-way communication with other stations across the
    globe. This activity will also serve as the Amateur Radio voice of the Jamboree," the World Scout Jamboree Amateur Radio Exhibit Operational
    Vision document <http://k2bsa.wstearns.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/WSJ-Amateur-Radio-Vision- V1.pdf>
    states. Other facets of Amateur Radio at the Jamboree will include
    Amateur Radio direction finding (ARDF), Amateur Radio satellite
    contacts, and a scheduled Amateur Radio on the International Space
    Station (ARISS) contact with an ISS crew member.

    "We also expect to launch one or two balloons with Amateur Radio
    payloads and track them as they cross the Atlantic," the vision
    document continues.

    Organizers are encouraging radio amateurs around the globe to get on
    the air during the World Jamboree to help NA1WJ demonstrate Amateur
    Radio for Jamboree visitors.

    The 2019 World Scout Jamboree operation at the Summit Bechtel Scout
    Reserve will take advantage of lessons learned by the K2BSA Amateur
    Radio operation during the 2013 and 2017 USA National Jamborees. It
    will also take advantage of the existing infrastructure, which includes
    three VHF/UHF repeaters installed by Icom America, as well as the
    utility poles for installing antennas. K2BSA ham gear stored in West
    Virginia includes antennas, rotators, and cables.

    Evening operation from NA1WJ will involve at least two operators using
    the buddy system. VHF/UHF repeaters will offer full coverage of the
    Jamboree area via handheld transceivers, facilitating networking as
    well as emergency communication. The exhibit will include an Amateur
    Radio station with the special event call sign W8J.

    The demonstration station will include multiple operating positions
    offering a variety of modes. These include six stations with 100 W HF transceivers, computer logging software, and large screen computer
    displays; two VHF/UHF stations for demonstrations and repeater
    monitoring, and two satellite communication systems. The antenna farm
    will include two HF directional antennas, three HF dipoles, three HF
    vertical antennas, VHF/UHF verticals and satellite antennas with
    azimuth and elevation control, a trailer-based crank-up tower, a
    five-band Yagi, a 40-meter rotatable dipole, and a 6-meter Yagi.

    Each station will be able to accommodate four participants at a time,
    plus one control operator. The goal is to give each participant up to
    about 10 minutes of operating time.

    The K2BSA Amateur Radio Association will host a "Radio Scouting" booth
    at Dayton Hamvention <http://www.hamvention.org>® (Booth 2205 in
    Building 2).

    SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY: AN ULTRA-SMALL TRANSMITTER FOR VLF?

    A study, "A high Q piezoelectric resonator as a portable VLF
    transmitter <https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-019-09680-2>," by
    Stanford University SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory researcher
    Mark A. Kemp et al., in the April 12, 2019, edition of Nature
    Communications describes using a small rod of lithium niobate and
    taking advantage of the material's piezoelectric properties to convert
    an imposed voltage to a mechanical effect, which in turn radiates an electromagnetic current.

    The National Accelerator Lab describes the research in an article,
    "SLAC develops novel compact antenna for communicating where radios
    fail <https://www6.slac.stanford.edu/news/2019-04-12-slac-develops-novel-compact-ant enna-communicating-where-radios-fail.aspx>,"
    which said a new type of pocket-sized devices "could be used in
    portable transmitters for rescue missions and other challenging
    applications demanding high mobility" where conventional radios don't
    work, such as under water, through the ground, and over very long
    distances through air. "The device emits VLF radiation with wavelengths
    of tens to hundreds of miles. These waves travel long distances beyond
    the horizon and can penetrate environments that would block radio waves
    with shorter wavelengths."

    "Our device is also hundreds of times more efficient and can transmit
    data faster than previous devices of comparable size," Kemp, the
    project's principal investigator. "Its performance pushes the limits of
    what's technologically possible and puts portable VLF applications,
    like sending short text messages in challenging situations, within
    reach."

    A new compact VLF transmitter, developed and tested at SLAC, consists
    of a 4-inch-long piezoelectric crystal (clear rod at center) that
    generates VLF radiation. [Photo courtesy of Dawn Harmer/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory]

    The paper by Kemp et al. points to the fact that large size and high
    loss render conventional transmitter techniques inadequate. "We show
    that a strain-based, piezoelectric transmitter can overcome many of the fundamental limitations of conventional electrically small antennas
    (ESA)," the paper's abstract reads. "These transmitters can resonate in
    a very small footprint while exhibiting low losses."

    Taking a deeper dive: "Traditionally, a disadvantage of passive high-Q
    antennas was low bandwidth. Utilizing piezoelectricity as the radiating
    element allows us to dynamically shift the transmitter resonant
    frequency. Therefore, high total Q (low loss) no longer constrains the
    system bandwidth. These are our fundamental advancements: Achieving an exceptionally high system Q with no external impedance matching network
    and an effective fractional bandwidth beyond the passive Bode-Fano
    limit <https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0016003250900068?via%3Dihub> Although demonstrated at VLF, this concept straightforwardly scales to
    other frequency bands."

    SO NOW WHAT? PODCAST

    "Finding the Right Club for You" is the focus of the new (May 2)
    episode of the So Now What? <http://www.arrl.org/so-now-what> podcast
    for Amateur Radio newcomers. If you're a newly licensed Amateur Radio
    operator, chances are you have lots of questions. This biweekly podcast
    has answers! So Now What? offers insights from those who've been just
    where you are now. New episodes will be posted every other Thursday, alternating new-episode weeks with the ARRL The Doctor is In <http://www.arrl.org/doctor> podcast.

    So Now What? is sponsored by LDG Electronics
    <http://www.ldgelectronics.com/>, a family owned and operated business
    with laboratories in southern Maryland that offers a wide array of
    antenna tuners and other Amateur Radio products.

    ARRL Communications Content Producer Michelle Patnode, W3MVP, and ARRL
    Station Manager Joe Carcia, NJ1Q, co-host the podcast. Presented as a
    lively conversation, with Patnode representing newer hams and Carcia
    the veteran operators, the podcast will explore questions that newer
    hams may have and the issues that keep participants from staying active
    in the hobby. Some episodes will feature guests to answer questions on
    specific topic areas.

    Listeners can find So Now What? on Apple iTunes <https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/arrl-so-now-what/id1451019115?mt=2>, Blubrry <https://www.blubrry.com/arrlnowwhat/>, Stitcher <https://www.stitcher.com/> (free registration required, or browse the
    site as a guest) and through the free Stitcher app for iOS, Kindle, or
    Android devices. Episodes will be archived on the ARRL website.

    ARRL'S FREE EXAM REVIEW FOR HAM RADIO UPDATED

    ARRL Exam Review for Ham Radio <http://www.arrl.org/examreview>(TM) has
    been updated in advance of the release of the ninth edition of The ARRL
    General Class License Manual for Ham Radio <https://www.arrl.org/shop/ARRL-General-Class-License-Manual-9th-Edition/>. ARRL Exam Review is a free online resource for use with current
    editions of ARRL License Manuals <http://www.arrl.org/shop/Licensing-Education-and-Training/>. The
    service can be accessed via a web browser, and uses the official
    examination question pools to construct chapter-by-chapter reviews.
    Upon completing study, Exam Review helps the license candidate take
    practice exams with the same number and variety of questions that he or
    she will encounter on exam day. Practice tests can be taken over and
    over, scored in complete privacy, or even printed with an answer key.
    Exam Review includes quick feedback about the questions missed.

    The update to Exam Review and the new edition General Class License
    Manual coincides with a new General Class question pool released
    earlier this year by the National Conference of Volunteer Examiner
    Coordinators (NCVEC <http://www.ncvec.org>). The new 2019 - 2023
    General Class question pool becomes effective on July 1, 2019 for
    examinations in the Amateur Radio Service. The 2015 - 2019 General
    Class pool remains in effect for exams given until June 30, 2019. ARRL
    Exam Review provides access to both the current and new General Class questions. (Read more <http://www.arrl.org/news/arrl-s-free-exam-review-for-ham-radio-updated>.)

    THE K7RA SOLAR UPDATE

    Tad Cook, K7RA, Seattle, reports: No sunspots were visible over the
    April 25 - May 1 reporting week, and so the average daily sunspot
    number dropped to zero after sitting at 8.1 during the previous 7 days.
    Average daily solar flux declined from 70.6 to 67.5. Geomagnetic
    indicators were quiet, with average planetary A index at 5.9, up from
    4.7 in the previous week.

    Predicted solar flux is 68 and 70 on May 2 - 3; 72 on May 4 - 5; 74 on
    May 6 - 9; 78 on May 10 - 16; 76, 72, and 70 on May 17 - 19; 69 on May
    20 - 21; 68 on May 22; 67 on May 23 - June 2; 70 and 75 on June 3 - 4;
    78 on June 5 - 12; 76, 72, and 70 on June 13 - 15.

    Predicted planetary A index is 15 and 10 on May 2 - 3; 5 on May 4 - 9;
    8 on May 10; 5 on May 11 - 19; 8 on May 20; 5 on May 21 - 26; 10, 14,
    12, 8, and 5 on May 27 - 31; 10, 12, and 14 on June 1 - 3; 8 on June 4
    - 6, and 5 on June 7 - 15.

    The New Yorker recently ran an article <https://bit.ly/2UvvVbN> about
    aurora borealis tourism.

    Sunspot numbers for April 25 - May 1, 2019 were 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, and
    0, with a mean of 0. The 10.7-centimeter flux was 67.5, 67.2, 66.9,
    67.9, 66.9, 68.5, and 67.6, with a mean of 67.5. Estimated planetary A
    indices were 5, 4, 6, 5, 5, 5, and 11, with a mean of 5.9. Middle
    latitude A index was 4, 2, 5, 4, 6, 4, and 8, with a mean of 4.7.

    A comprehensive K7RA Solar Update is posted Fridays on the ARRL
    website. For more information concerning radio propagation, visit <http://arrl.org/propagation-of-rf-signals> the ARRL Technical
    Information Service, read
    <http://arrl.org/the-sun-the-earth-the-ionosphere> "What the Numbers
    Mean...," and check out <http://k9la.us/> K9LA's Propagation Page.

    A propagation bulletin archive <http://arrl.org/w1aw-bulletins-archive-propagation> is available.
    Monthly charts <http://arrl.org/propagation> offer propagation
    projections between the US and a dozen DX locations.

    Share <k7ra@arrl.net> your reports and observations.

    JUST AHEAD IN RADIOSPORT

    - May 3 - 4 -- MIE 33 Contest (CW, phone)

    - May 4 -- FISTS Spring Slow Speed Sprint (CW)

    - May 4 - 5 -- New England QSO Party (CW, phone, digital)

    - May 4 - 5 -- 7th Call Area QSO Party (CW, phone, digital)

    - May 4 - 5 -- Indiana QSO Party (CW, phone)

    - May 4 -5 -- Delaware QSO Party (CW, phone)

    - May 4 - 5 -- 10-10 International Spring Contest, CW

    - May 4 - 5 -- SBMS 2.3 GHz and Up Contest (CW, phone)

    - May 4 -- Microwave Spring Sprint (CW, phone)

    - May 4 - 5 -- ARI International DX Contest (CW, phone)

    - May 4 - 5 -- Araucaria World Wide VHF Contest (CW, phone)

    - May 7 -- ARS Spartan Sprint (CW)

    See the ARRL Contest Calendar <http://www.arrl.org/contest-calendar>
    for more information. For in-depth reporting on Amateur Radio
    contesting, subscribe to The ARRL Contest Update <http://www.arrl.org/contest-update-issues> via your ARRL member
    profile email preferences.

    HAMSCI, HAM RADIO 2.0 TO COMBINE EFFORTS AT DAYTON HAMVENTION 2019

    Thanks to support from the Yasme Foundation <http://www.yasme.org>, the
    citizen science organization HamSCI <http://www.hamsci.org/> and Ham
    Radio 2.0 will share space and combine efforts at Dayton Hamvention <http://www.hamvention.org>® 2019, which is also the 2019 ARRL National Convention. Their displays will be in Building 4 (Volta), which is
    between the food trucks and the flea market.

    The Ham Radio 2.0 area will serve to host a series of "booth talks"
    both by HamSCI presenters and presenters with a "2-point-0" perspective
    on operating and technology that looks to the future of ham radio. Presentations begin at 10 AM on Friday and continue through 3 PM on
    Saturday.

    Friday, 10 AM

    HR 2.0

    Moonbounce Via the MIT Remote Linked EME Station

    Marty Sullaway, NN1C

    Friday, 11 AM

    HamSCI

    New Directions in Sporadic-E Research

    Bill Engelke, AB4EJ, University of Alabama

    Friday, Noon

    HR 2.0

    Contesting with FT4: Issues and Opportunities Going Forward

    John Pescatore, K3TN

    Friday, 1 PM

    HamSCI

    The Third Source of F2 Region Variability

    Carl Luetzelschwab, K9LA

    Friday, 2 PM

    HR 2.0

    How Real-Time Scoreboards Change Contesting

    Victor Androsov, VA2WA

    Friday, 3 PM

    HamSCI

    RBN & WSPRNet Response to September 2017 Solar Flares and Storms

    Nathaniel Frissell, W2NAF, NJ Institute of Technology

    Saturday, 10 AM

    HR 2.0

    Balloon Pico Races

    Bill Brown, WB8ELK

    Saturday, 11 AM

    HamSCI

    To Be Announced

    Saturday, Noon

    HR 2.0

    Youth Contesting Program in North America

    Jocelyn Brault, KD8VRX, and Bryant Rascoll, KG5HVO

    Saturday, 1 PM

    HamSCI

    Propagation on 630 and 2200 Meters

    Carl Luetzelschwab, K9LA

    Saturday, 2 PM

    HR 2.0

    SOTA and New Methods of Portable Operating

    Paula Uscian, K9IR

    Saturday, 3 PM

    HamSCI

    HF Satellite Observations of Field Day

    Gareth Perry, NJ Institute of Technology

    In addition to the presentations, the Ham Radio 2.0 area will be home
    to a mini-booth staffed by members of the Young Amateurs Radio Club
    (YARC <https://yarc.world/>) and the Young Contesters Program (YC <https://yarc.world/ycp/>P) that is associated with the European
    Youngsters On The Air (YOTA <ham-yota.com>) program. It's an
    opportunity to get acquainted with radio amateurs doing interesting
    things in interesting places.

    HamSCI also will offer the HamSCI Forum Saturday, 9:15 - 10:30 AM
    (Forum Room 4).

    Full details <http://hamsci.org/hamvention-2019-hamsci-team> are on the
    HamSCI website.

    ANNUAL ARMED FORCES DAY CROSSBAND TEST SET FOR MAY 11

    The Army Military Auxiliary Radio System (MARS) will host the
    traditional military/Amateur Radio communication tests to mark the 68th
    annual Armed Forces Day (AFD) on Saturday, May 11. The event is open to
    all radio amateurs. Armed Forces Day is May 18, but the AFD Crossband Military-Amateur Radio event traditionally takes place 1 week earlier
    in order to avoid conflicting with Dayton Hamvention®. Complete
    information, including military stations, modes, and frequencies, is
    available <http://www.usarmymars.org/events/armed-forces-day> on the US
    Army MARS website.

    "For more than 50 years, military and amateur stations have taken part
    in this event, which is only an exercise scenario, designed to include
    hobbyist and government radio operators alike," the event announcement
    said. "The AFD Crossband Test is a unique opportunity to test two-way communications between military communicators and radio stations in the
    Amateur Radio Service, as authorized in 47 CFR 97.111. These tests
    provide opportunities and challenges for radio operators to demonstrate individual technical skills in a tightly-controlled exercise scenario
    that does not impact any public or private communications."

    During the event, military stations in various locations will transmit
    on selected military frequencies and announce the specific ham
    frequencies they are monitoring.

    Military stations expected to be on the air for the event include those
    in Arizona, Japan, Hawaii, Okinawa, Washington, DC (and elsewhere in
    the contiguous states), the USS Midway, the USS Yorktown, the USS Iowa, LST-325, the US Naval Academy in Annapolis, and the Newport Naval Radio
    Station Museum in Rhode Island. The MARSCOMM and MARSRADIO nationwide
    networks will have multiple stations on the air across the continental
    US.

    An AFD message will be transmitted utilizing the Military Standard
    (MIL-STD) serial PSK waveform (M110) followed by MIL-STD Wide Shift FSK
    (850 Hz RTTY), as described in MIL-STD 188-110A/B. Technical
    information <http://www.n2ckh.com/MARS_ALE_FORUM/MSDMT.html> is
    available. The AFD message will also be sent in CW and RTTY, as
    indicated on the full schedule <http://www.usarmymars.org/events/armed-forces-day>. Anyone wanting a
    QSL should complete the request form <http://www.usarmymars.org/events>
    on the MARS website.

    IN BRIEF...

    School Club Roundup (SCR) certificates are now available for the
    February 2019 event as well as for any future SCRs. Download these via
    the Certificate menu item on the ARRL Contests Portal <http://contests.arrl.org/>. Top US/Canada performers included the
    Russell Elementary Amateur Radio Club (KM4RE) in the Elementary/Primary category; Schofield Middle School Ham Radio Club (N4SMS) in Middle/Intermediate/Junior High category; LASA High School Amateur
    Radio Club (K5LBJ) in the Senior High category, and Purdue University
    (W9YB) in the College/University category. Complete results <http://contests.arrl.org/scrscores.php?id=595> are on the School Club
    Roundup Results page.

    +++

    Some 50 students in Gujarat, India, on April 12 were introduced to
    Amateur Radio, satellites, and Amateur Radio on the International Space
    Station (ARISS <http://www.ariss.org>). Rajesh Vagadia, VU2EXP, gave a
    brief talk on Amateur Radio, the ISS, ham satellites, astronauts, and
    the April ARISS SSTV event. During a visible pass of the ISS, Vagadia,
    using a three-element Yagi, handheld transceiver, and a recording
    device, was able to record two SSTV images. "It was an exciting
    experience for all, sighting the ISS, and at the same time getting
    signals from it," Vagadia commented afterward. "[It] felt like having a handshake with the ISS crew!" Decoded images were shared with all
    students as souvenirs.

    +++

    AMSAT Academy will take place on Thursday, May 16, the day before
    Dayton Hamvention <http://www.hamvention.org>®. AMSAT says this is a
    unique opportunity for both beginners and advanced satellite operators
    to learn about Amateur Radio in space and working the FM, linear
    transponder, and digital satellites now in orbit. AMSAT Academy will
    take place on Thursday, May 16, 9 AM until 5 PM, at the Dayton Amateur
    Radio Association (DARA) clubhouse, 6619 Bellefontaine Road, in Dayton,
    Ohio. The $85 registration fee includes a full day of instruction
    taught by some of the most-accomplished AMSAT operators; a digital copy
    of Getting Started with Amateur Satellites (2019 ed.); 1 year of AMSAT
    Basic membership; pizza buffet lunch, and an invitation to the Thursday
    night AMSAT get together at Ticket Pub & Eatery in Fairborn.
    Registration closes on May 10 and will not be available at the door. No
    refunds or cancellations. Register at the AMSAT Store <https://www.amsat.org/product/amsat-academy-registration/>.

    UPCOMING ARRL SECTION, STATE, AND DIVISION CONVENTIONS

    - May 5 -- Eastern Pennsylvania Section Convention <http://www.k3dn.org/hamfest/>, Bristol, Pennsylvania

    - May 17 - 19 -- Dayton Hamvention -- ARRL National Convention <http://www.hamvention.org/>, Xenia, Ohio

    - May 31 - June 1 -- Arizona State Convention
    <http://hamfest.w7yrc.org/>, Prescott, Arizona

    - May 31 - June 2 -- Northwestern Division Convention
    <http://www.seapac.org/>, Seaside, Oregon

    - June 1 -- Georgia Section Convention
    <http://www.atlantahamfest.org/>, Marietta, Georgia

    - June 1 - 2 -- Western Pennsylvania Section Convention <http://www.breezeshooters.org/>, Prospect, Pennsylvania

    - June 7 - 8 -- West Gulf Division Convention <http://www.hamcom.org/> (Ham-Com), Plano, Texas

    - June 15 -- W8DXCC DX Convention <http://www.w8dxcc.com/>, Owensville,
    Ohio

    - July 19 - 21 -- Nevada State Convention <http://nvcon.org/>, Reno,
    Nevada

    - July 25 - 27 -- Central States VHF Conference
    <http://www.csvhfs.org/>, Lincoln, Nebraska

    - July 26 - 27 -- Ham Holiday <https://hamholiday.com/>, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

    Find conventions and hamfests in your area
    <http://www.arrl.org/hamfests>.

    ARRL -- Your One-Stop Resource for
    Amateur Radio News and Information.

    .

    .

    - Join or Renew Today! <http://www.arrl.org/join> ARRL membership
    includes QST <http://www.arrl.org/qst>, Amateur Radio's most popular
    and informative journal, delivered to your mailbox each month.

    - Listen to ARRL Audio News <http://www.arrl.org/arrl-audio-news>,
    available every Friday.

    Subscribe to...

    - NCJ -- National Contest Journal <http://www.ncjweb.com/>. Published bimonthly, features articles by top contesters, letters, hints,
    statistics, scores, NA Sprint, and QSO parties.

    - QEX <http://www.arrl.org/qex> -- A Forum for Communications
    Experimenters <http://www.arrl.org/qex>. Published bimonthly, features technical articles, construction projects, columns, and other items of
    interest to radio amateurs and communications professionals.

    The ARRL Letter is published Thursdays, 48 times each year. ARRL
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    Copyright (c) 2019 American Radio Relay League, Incorporated.
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    ... You cannot kill time without injuring eternity.
    --- GoldED+/LNX 1.1.5-b20180707
    * Origin: Outpost BBS * Limestone, TN, USA (1:18/200)
  • From Sean Dennis@1:18/200 to All on Fri May 3 08:55:00 2019
    Hello All,

    Right now I am hand-posting these via my Gmail interface using the "original message" (text) format. I'm able to go to the website (http://arrl.org/arrl-letter) and get a text dump of it using links but I need to write a script to scrape all of the extra cruft out of it. Another project using my good friend sed. :D

    Later,
    Sean

    ... Anything free is worth what you pay for it.
    --- GoldED+/LNX 1.1.5-b20180707
    * Origin: Outpost BBS * Limestone, TN, USA (1:18/200)
  • From Holger Granholm@2:20/228 to Sean Dennis on Sat May 4 13:51:00 2019
    In a message on 05-03-19 Sean Dennis said to All:

    Hi Sean,

    Right now I am hand-posting these via my Gmail interface using the "original message" (text) format.

    Just a hint: when saving the ARRL bulletins I name them according to the terminology ARRL uses.

    So the ARRL DX Bulletin ARLD this week gets the file name ARLD018.ZIP
    The ARRL letter this week is consequently be archived as ARLL018.


    CU AGN, Sam, OH0NC

    aka Holger


    .. <Ctrl><Alt><Del> to read the next message
    -- MR/2 2.30

    --- PCBoard (R) v15.22 (OS/2) 2
    * Origin: Coming to you from the Sunny Aland Islands. (2:20/228)
  • From Daryl Stout@1:19/33 to HOLGER GRANHOLM on Sun May 5 12:54:00 2019
    JHolger,

    Just a hint: when saving the ARRL bulletins I name them according to the HG>terminology ARRL uses.

    So the ARRL DX Bulletin ARLD this week gets the file name ARLD018.ZIP
    The ARRL letter this week is consequently be archived as ARLL018.

    I just post the bulletins from W1AW, and Amateur Radio Newsline over
    here.

    Daryl, WX4QZ

    ===
    ž OLX 1.53 ž Out of my mind. Be back in five minutes.
    --- SBBSecho 3.07-Win32
    * Origin: FIDONet: The Thunderbolt BBS - tbolt.synchro.net (1:19/33)